How to (I) Measure Loads to Determine What Size Solar Battery Bank and How Many Solar Panels to Have

How to (I) Measure Loads to Determine What Size Solar Battery Bank and How Many Solar Panels to Have

how I measure loads that will draw from solar battery bank. in a second part will cover how I size batteries and how many watts to have for solar panels.

19 Comments on “How to (I) Measure Loads to Determine What Size Solar Battery Bank and How Many Solar Panels to Have”

  1. your table at 11:33 is extremely usefull to establish how many watt-hours we are using in a period of 24 hours. So suppose my total is 2400 watthours. If i buy 4 Fullriver 6 volts golf battery AGM deep cycle, this is equivalent to 2 unit of 12 volts 225 AmpHour for a total of 450 Amp-hours. This is 12 volt x 450 AH= 5400 Watt-Hour but only 50% is available if i dont want to degrade the battery so 5400/2= 2700 and i will loose probably 300 WH in the conversion process. So only 2400 WH is available and buying a bank of 4 100 watts solar panel give me 400 watt of solar multiplied by 6 hours of light in a day for a total of 2400 WH so i can use 2400 and i am using 2400 so my deep cycle of charging and loading is complete. So you have to add this in your discussion. But i absolutely love your table of watts and hour to establish the total watt-hour required in the solar system and battery bank

  2. hint:
    – when you multiply watts * hours, what unit do you get?
    A: watts per hour is not a conventional unit and defines whoever talks in those terms as scientifically illiterate. The unit is watt.hours. If you want to define how many watt.hours are used in a specific time such as 1 hour, you say x watt.hours per hour. A watt is a flow rate (joules per second), so it is meaningless gibberish to talk of watts per hour (joules per second per hour makes no sense unless you are accelerating power, which is hillbilly insanity)

    – you need a new fridge. a 320 watt compressor is around 3 times a new fridge suitable for 1-2 adults. and a 12V fridge would reduce power consumption by around 40-50% versus 120V fridge.

  3. Thanks man very much for this practical and informative  video as your other videos. I enjoyed very much. Thanks again and again for your effort.

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